Bernadette Arnaud

Bernadette Arnaud

Bernadette Arnaud Artist artworks for sale

  Rated 4.5 / 5.0 by 72 clients as the best artist
  Artist: Bernadette Arnaud
 Live in: Berlin, Berlin, Germany
 Artworks for sale: 5.00
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Bernadette Arnaud Artist Bio:

Text / Interview: Daniela Jonas I am visiting Bernadette Arnaud, an artist from Paris, at her home in Berlin Wilmersdorf, where I am being treated with tea and delicious biscuits. Her flat is amazingly cosy, I feel very comfortable, and while sipping from a cup of Darjeeling, I take a closer look at Ms Arnaud's paintings. There are paintings from her time at the Beaux Arts in Paris hanging on the walls and, as she tells me, paintings that were done by her sister and father, which comes as a surprise. What was your inspiration to start painting in the first place? My family. Art has always been a part of our family, which is why it felt completely natural for me to study art. I began taking drawing lessons when I was 15 or 16. However, much to my disappointment, it turned out to be really boring and static, so I decided to drop it. I then developed an interest in architecture and even considered studying it. What happened next? You obviously didn't go for architecture. No, I didn't. At the time, my mother took me to an artist friend of hers. When I was standing in her studio, it all became clear. And the rest, as they say, is history. I wanted to be a painter. Whatever it took. It was such an amazing feeling standing in this beautiful studio surrounded by colours, and smells, and all those lovely paintings. What also really attracted me to painting was the idea to become thoroughly proficient in the craft. I mean "proficient" as in becoming a master of something and being able to create/produce something. You studied painting at the École des Beaux-Arts and finished your studies at the HDK, which is now the UDK, in Berlin. From an artistic point of view, how did you cope with the change? Well, it really was a big change. In Paris, I had primarily focused on working figuratively. So when I moved to Berlin, it had a very liberating effect on me. The Berlin art scene at the time was very abstract, very reduced, few colours. A rather intellectual kind of art, I would say. It was different at the HDK though. The students were sitting all over the hallways of the HDK painting exuberant colour compositions onto huge cardboard boxes with 8-inches thick brushes. There was an almost anarchist spirit prevailing at the university. Those students were the Junge Wilde movement (German for "wild youth"). It was here in Berlin where I began painting large-format canvasses and experimenting with abstract elements. In the meantime you made the switch to figurative painting again. That's right. In Berlin, I did realise how French I am. This is evident in my artwork, which is influenced by elements of French impressionism. In my current works I combine two moments - the still life, the figurative, which is interrupted and connected by lines at the same time. This way, something new develops, which I feel is hugely fascinating. Bringing together two moments and have them interact had been a major theme for me already during my studies in Paris and now I can see it happening in my current paintings. This is just amazing. What inspires you? Nature. It's as simple as that. When I first started working figuratively, I followed a rather pragmatic approach - I was trying to find a subject, which was aesthetic on the one hand, and easy to come by on the other hand. So I decided to use roses. This is how my rose-themed series came about. What are your views on the current art scene in Germany compared to France? I feel that the art scene generally has become much more individual, there are no more influential art movements. Anything is possible. Of course, this has numerous advantages, you're free to do what you want, and your creativity flows more freely. Being independent, however, requires a lot of courage and stamina. Artists nowadays are often left to their own devices.