Bill Guffey

Bill Guffey

Bill Guffey Artist artworks for sale

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  Artist: Bill Guffey
 Live in: Burkesville, KY, United States
 Artworks for sale: 7.00
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Bill Guffey Artist Bio:

Bill Guffey was born and raised in the small, south central Kentucky town of Burkesville. Growing up in the rural area left much to be desired in the way of entertainment, and Guffey turned to drawing and painting at a young age. With no art teachers in the vicinity he took it upon himself to learn what he could through the use of television and books and magazines. He set up a booth at the annual Arts and Crafts Fair at the age of 12, with his simple, enthusiastic paintings. To his delight the high school started their first art class his senior year. The next few years to follow were filled with sketching, drawing, and painting sporadically, accompanied by much travel and adventure. Leaving Kentucky, Bill headed west as a young man and ended up in the ski resort town of Breckenridge, Colorado. After the first winter of over 300 inches of snow he was ready for a warm destination. So it was off to the Caribbean. Bill lived for a short time on the small island of St. John, in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Beach life and night life was the laid back, and slowly paced norm on St. John, to which he was happy to endure both. Living in an apartment with only screens for windows and the daily lizards in the shower was a precursor of eclectic living situations for the young artist. After leaving the island life he headed back to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. He lived for a few months in Denver, in places that included the house of a paranoid, tow truck driving, Harley riding acquaintance that thought a spell had been cast upon him, with loaded guns, snakes and tarantulas plentiful around the house; to a one story, old motel called the Titan in a rough part of the city, whose renters were financially challenged people like himself, along with addicts, prostitutes, and roaches; a couple of multi-roommate situations full of people from all walks of life; and finally to a basement apartment that was the most normal, warm, clean, and safe place the 22 year old had lived in some time. The mountains were calling again and we would see Bill moving to a 100+ year old mining cabin, just outside Breckenridge, Colorado. At an elevation of almost 11,000 feet, the cabin had no electricity or running water, although the outhouse was one of the deepest in the region as it was set over a vertical mine shaft that was long unused. Living through a couple of winters in this place was possible for the young man, but was harder than anything Bill had experienced before. With no sunlight hitting the cabin directly in the winter, everything was to freeze as the cold, hard, snowy season set in. A hike of a half mile on a trail was required to reach the cabin in the forest, and if one day was missed walking the packed trail it would be lost to the snow which seemed to fall almost daily. Steps were dug out of the deep snow at the front of the cabin to get up to the level of the trails to town, to the outhouse, and to the beaver pond. Some sketching and pastel work was done while living in the cabin, but most of this time was spent on surviving, and enjoying the mountain man lifestyle. After the cabin, a few more years were spent in Breckenridge enjoying the ski town life and living with a cast of characters that would challenge any modern day sitcom. More than a decade after leaving Kentucky, Bill returned home to open (and close) a bookstore, get married, start a family, and finally have the stability and support to get serious about his art. Bill now owns a building on a prominent corner of the courthouse square in Burkesville, Kentucky. He teaches classes there, and paints in the studio every day. Up at 5 a.m. daily for the opportunity to paint before going to his job as a graphic artist at the local newspaper is just a small part of the devotion Bill has for his artistic journey. Bill gets up and paints every day. He tolerates chaos, and works harder at his craft than anything he has done in his entire life.