Cécile van Hanja

Cécile van Hanja

Cécile van Hanja Artist artworks for sale

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  Artist: Cécile van Hanja
 Live in: Haarlem, Netherlands
 Artworks for sale: 0
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Cécile van Hanja Artist Bio:

Cécile van Hanja born in Corsica (1964) graduated from the Gerrit Rietveld Academie (Amsterdam) in 1993. Currently she lives and works in Haarlem (The Netherlands). She was selected by the La Napoule Art foundation for a artist in residence at the Château La Napoule in France and she obtain a 2 years grant from the BKVB foundation in Amsterdam. Her work is in different private collections in France, US, Switzerland and in the Netherlands. Her work is now represented by Galerie BMB in Amsterdam, (the Netherlands). Cécile van Hanja about her work: My source of inspiration is the Modernism at the beginning of the 20th century. The architecture of Bauhaus and De Stijl is for me a reflection of order in a time of chaos. Especially Mondrian as a pioneer in his strive for harmony and unity and architects like Mies van der Rohe who emphasise the immaterial aspect of a building by creating an open space. Besides the beauty of their creations, I'm also fascinated by the lost idealism of progress and malleability where this movement stood for. In my paintings the images of modern architecture are based on a rhythmical pattern of verticals and horizontals in which an uncertain world is created; a multi coloured labyrinth of spaces and look-throughs in which it's not clear if one is inside or outside. The transparant walls and floors with reflections on the opposite walls don't give any footing and the perspective lines and vanishing points, like rational benchmarks lead to an irrational and intuitive way of thinking. One can ask if we as an obsever are part of this structure or excluded. In other words; can our private life be part of these anonymous structures? The transparant layered structure of the painting intensifies the depth and the confusion. Thin layers of acrylic paint allow the colours underneath to shine through. It is not until the third or fourth layer that oil paint is added. It is precisely because of the thin transparant painting which leaves underlying layers of colours visible, that the architectural compostion does not become a static image of impenetrable walls. The painted façade seems to consist of parts that come forward and recede. The window sections in between may reveal something of the interior, in vibrating light. A lost modern world symbolising confusion and uncertainty that depict our time.