David Mitchell

David Mitchell

David Mitchell Artist artworks for sale

  Rated 4.5 / 5.0 by 24 clients as the best artist
  Artist: David Mitchell
 Live in: Brighton, United Kingdom
 Artworks for sale: 60.00
Views: 3740
Favorite: 168
Show all David Mitchell Artworks
on Saatchi Art


David Mitchell Artist Bio:

¬ DAVID M. MITCHELL PHOTOGRAPHS Essay by Lyle Rexer and Interview with David-Elijah Nahmod The British-born, Bangkok-based photographer makes large, luminous abstractions that look like stained-glass windows designed by a color-field painter. Juxtaposing blocks of hot, cool, and sugar-sweet colors (the spectrum veers from fauve to Necco wafer), he makes images that are at once orderly and trippy. The pictures are Mitchell's attempt to give form to the auras he experiences as a result of left-temporal-lobe epilepsy, and they sometimes appear more atmospheric than solid, as if they were about to evanesce out of their frames. Vince Aletti, The New Yorker November, 2013   INTRODUCTION Lynn Dunham - January, 2016 Looking back to the 1970’s, artists introduced photography as conceptual art, challenging the medium and bringing photography to the forefront of contemporary art. Artists like John Baldessari and Barbara Kruger, interfered with the delineation between painting and photography by merging mediums even before the 70’s. They were included in “The Pictures Generation, 1974–1984”, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2009. Artists of this movement stood by the belief that painting was dead; they appropriated from commercial resources and caused photography to be considered differently in the context of fine art; but painting was not dying then, nor is it today. It is the boundaries which define art forms which are dying. Artists like Mitchell who are interfering with what aesthetically segregates painting from photography are causing one to rethink the definitions of both disciplines. Photography as fine art and has continued to evolve with technology as computers have become an extension to the camera changing the medium forever. Rather than a device for reportage, the camera has become a tool which can document complex aesthetic and conceptual ideas through control and manipulation of composition, color balance, exposure, staging and editing. Like James Casebere, who virtually invented the tradition of “in-studio, staged” photography by dramatically lighting tabletop architectural models, Mitchell stages assemblage/collage then incorporates multiple exposures and lighting variables, and chronicles such through the lens. He destroys his assemblages, further removing the relationship between what is left in print form and the original material that his photography investigates not unlike the studio practice of Thomas Demand who used the camera to capture temporary installations. Mitchell's ethereal aesthetic, prevalent in his commercial style, continued in his early fine art photography and making the transition from film to digital, he created the Diaphanous, Linear, and Janusian series which exemplify this atmospheric sensibility and also reveal a transition to abstract image making. In 2009, the Luminaries Window series defined the archetype upon which Mitchell’s oeuvre is based today. Since shooting this series of paper-covered windows in a disused hotel in Bangkok, he adopted a hard edge architectural interest and began his studio practice of assembling and collaging temporary staged material to document. The use of post facto digital manipulating tools became more fundamental to the making of art and the conventional notion of photography as representational was replaced with a non-objective emphasis. He continues to construct in the physical sense although in 2015 he introduced additional digital collage, using elements he has archived over the past few years. An essay by Lyle Rexer which was originally published in 2013 for an exhibition catalogue by Jim Kempner Fine Art, is included in its entirety as well as an interview with David-Elijah Nahmod that was published in 2014 by the San Francisco Weekly which coincided with a solo exhibition at The Dryansky Gallery in San Francisco. “There is the danger that in this correspondence an instrument will be created which will tell the public how the pictures should be looked at and what to look for. Whil