Matt Holmes

Matt Holmes

Matt Holmes Artist artworks for sale

  Rated 4.5 / 5.0 by 35 clients as the best artist
  Artist: Matt Holmes
 Live in: London, United Kingdom
 Artworks for sale: 6.00
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Matt Holmes Artist Bio:

I am interested in the emotional connection that forms between the viewer and the piece of art. Therefore, everything i create aims to connect with people on the most elemental of levels, addressing basic human instincts and emotions through the use of primal, and often forceful, patterns and motifs. I attempt to explore how and why this bond occurs; how much the viewer is influenced by the name of a painting, the subject matter, the colours used, and the style of painting. In my 'Composition' series, i wanted to provoke a reaction in the viewer, even though the paintings themselves are devoid of any actual subject matter. Instead by concerning myself solely with the physical painting process, the viewer is free to find their own personal connection to the piece, one not influenced by any preconceived thoughts or ideas. Though spontaneous in appearance, the pieces are actually considered and time consuming. Layer upon layer of paint is applied, each meticulously scraped and dragged along the canvas leaving residue of the previous colour to merge, bind and separate with its successor. Knife edges, brush handles and rulers are used to gently prize the surface apart, before sponges and brush strokes close it again in an unfamiliar manner. Cracks are forced into being through the manipulation of the surface, whilst uneven patterns of paint form, creating unintended areas of depth and focal points. The intimate struggle appearing within the confines of the canvas offers the viewer the choice to envelop themselves in the painting and form their own bond with it. While my interest lies in the emotive value of colour and abstract gestures, the effect they have upon a person is a consequence of their own history. Whether they are reminded of a particular time, place or feeling is relevant to them and them alone, and the next spectator could feel something completely different. I try to remain impartial to the individual works throughout the painting process, not allowing my own emotions to influence the direction of the piece. In the same vein, naming them would be to impose any thoughts of my own upon the viewer, thus rendering the project futile. In accordance, all pieces in the series are simply a numbered composition. In my 'Primal' series, my aim slightly differs; whereas the composition series concerned itself solely with creating an uninfluenced emotional response within the viewer, this project takes the same starting point, then engulfs it within feelings and issues that are universal in their themes. Layers of paint are applied to the canvas, dragged and tugged across the surface, sometimes blending, sometimes contrasting. Various instruments are used to break and adjust the forming image; cuts, divots and holes tear through the colours, allowing glimpses of their predecessors. Areas of subtle colour compete with dramatic and violent brush strokes, creating struggle within struggle on the canvas. This warring image is then covered in a final sheet of singular bold colour which is left to partially settle before being scratched away to show the conflict that has come before. It is in this act that the painting reveals its true form; a visual explosion of tension that suggests emotions such as loss, hope and frustration. The conclusion that no matter how much we cover up our past, it will always be there, hidden beneath the surface waiting to show itself. Everything we have been through is part of the person we are today; the highs we have experienced, the lows we have struggled through, the things we remember and the things we choose to forget all form part of our present. This truth is all encompassing; it applies to governments, to landscapes, to cities and to nature. Scratch away at the surface and you will find that which has been before. The compositions owe much to Tribal Art in the manner they attempt to address basic human instincts and emotions through the use of primal, forceful patterns. The masses of vertical and horizontal scratches attack the near calmness of the covering surface, suggesting passion and violence laying beneath an almost wistful, spiritual longing.