Michel Berberian

Michel Berberian

Michel Berberian Artist artworks for sale

  Rated 4.5 / 5.0 by 80 clients as the best artist
  Artist: Michel Berberian
 Live in: Vers-Pont du Gard, Gard, France
 Artworks for sale: 29.00
Views: 3305
Favorite: 162
Show all Michel Berberian Artworks
on Saatchi Art


Michel Berberian Artist Bio:

Many of us see the artist as a bohemian living by his wits and deviancy, on the fringe of society, without spouse or family life, drinking, on drugs, and eating the soles of his shoes. Michel Berberian use to work in advertising, to live in a single family home with wife and children, he has consumed but the minimum of Côtes du Rhône so as not to pass for a killjoy, and uses his soles to walk on. Many see the artist as a backward person, or one who is not in tune with a materialist world, simultaneously with the simplest motivation and the most complicated methods. Michel, however, drives his sedan swiftly, knows how to make a business plan, writes commercial sales blurbs, is installing the latest version of Internet Explorer on his i-Mac and an automatic watering system in his yard. As a matter of fact Michel, as opposed to certain painters or rather, to our views of them, is well adjusted. And yet, he is painting. He paints running men (L'Homme Courant, Man Running, commonplace and oh so current), big birds that fly, lop-sided faces, women rising up. So many people who evolve in the midst of a complex magma of vivacious colours, (Les Mots d'Estomacs, Tummy Words, quadriptych painted on the instructions of a pharmaceutical lab). But if Michel is indeed mastering the complexity of the system, it's clear that he is also suffering from it. In his paintings, the characters have been gnawed-on, are nearly harrowed by the magma, (L'Homme en Colère, the Man in Anger, "not getting indignant equals abdicating"). The running man is in the midst of a bombardment, the heads seem to be irradiated, and the bird appears to be vitrified in flight. Michel attempts to escape himself, in vain: the man is running in a conflagration which extends beyond the painting's frame, the bird is still gliding but another hail of missiles will pull it to pieces, the face has "lost its head;" as it were, and the woman rising up into the air is but a crucified body. It is said that "true art is not decorative" and we tend to think that artists cannot exist without suffering. Michel Berberian expresses a particular kind of suffering: the suffering of the alienation to which we are subjected daily; an alienation which, contrary to dictatorships, is less on our outside than inside of us, such an intimate alienation that it is difficult to express... unless you are an artist. Michel Berberian's paintings, often in big formats, use acrylic and soft lead pencil. An instinctive and powerful gesture combined with a perfectly assimilated technique produce works of a rare power and originality. This masterfully orchestrated sequence of forms and colours is exerting an irresistible appeal. Several themes are recurrent in the abundance of his paintings: L'Homme Courant This running man is a bit like every one of us. Running after what? Progress, happiness or the bus? Or fleeing what, original chaos, the pressures of modern world or simply escaping from oneself? This, at any rate, is universal man, so human with his apparent fragility, commonplace and oh so current. Les Mots d'Estomac "One day when I was working on the advertising campaign of a pharmaceutical lab, I noticed that the therapeutic instructions of one of their leading drugs described exactly the diseases associated with junk food. Straight away I took the text and had much enlarged serigraphs made, on thick carton boards which I then used as a basis to work on this series." Les Homme en Colère Everywhere the world is driving us to legitimate anger. Sane man owes himself indignation, protest against fate, injustice, and the forces which surpass us. Not to be indignant equals accepting or abdicating. Thus, in an irrational way man does cry out, is voicing his indignation, his anger. For Michel Berberian this scream expresses all the energy of the furor of living or surviving. Michel Berberian was born in 1949 into a family of artists and antiquarians. When he is ten years old, his parents open an art gallery in Paris. Very early he spends most of his Thursday afternoons and Sundays with the painter Gen Paul, a painter of the gallery and a friend. In this way he naturally becomes the student of this great Montmartre painter until Gen Paul dies in 1974. At the end of his studies, after a long sojourn in the United States, he opens his own design studio. He starts to work as a poster designer for the theatre, then for the cinema, for its greatest: Jean-Luc Goddard, Carlos Sauras, Bertrand Tavernier, Éric Rohmer, James Ivory etc. Thus he exercises the function of creative artist of an advertising agency during more than twenty years. But the necessity to come back to the sources of personal expression haunts him. Towards the end of the "˜90s he picks up his paint brush again and for several years carries out a double activity, creating advertising campaigns during the week and painting on the weekends. Progressively he thus dev