Tamás Kopasz

Tamás Kopasz

Tamás Kopasz Artist artworks for sale

  Rated 4.5 / 5.0 by 98 clients as the best artist
  Artist: Tamás Kopasz
 Live in: Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
 Artworks for sale: 192.00
Views: 4155
Favorite: 154
Show all Tamás Kopasz Artworks
on Saatchi Art


Tamás Kopasz Artist Bio:

Tamás Kopasz (Szeged, Hungary, 1958) [email protected] 1977-1981 Hungarian University of Fine Arts 1993-1999 The establishment and operation of the Mű-Terem Gallery 1995-2009 Teacher in the Ferenczy István Visual Workshop 1999-2005 Teacher in the Szőnyi István Summer Art School 2000-2011 Teacher of Dance- and Art High School in Győr, sculpture dep. 2009- Associate Professor of Eszterházy Károly College 2010- Art Director of GébArt International Art Camp in Zalaegerszeg 1987-1990 Derkovits-scholarship 1989-1990 Pollock-Krasner Foundation,(USA) scholarship 1990 Prize of Barcsay Foundation 1990 Budapest-scholarship, München-Feldafing (Germany) 1993 Budapest- scholarship, Salzburg, (Austria) 1995-1996 DAAD scholarship, Atelierhaus Worpswede, (Germany) 2000 Munkácsy-prize 2003 Budapest- scholarship, Frankfurt am Main, (Germany) 2004 Hungart- scholarship 2006 Roman scholarship, Hungarian Academy in Rome 2015 33.Spring Exhibition in Salgotarjan, Grand Prix 2015 A Műút c. Literary Criticism, Art and Fine Art Prize Member of: MAOE, Artists’ League, Allience of Graphic Artists, Hungarian Painters’ Society, Society of Sculptors, Hungarian Händel Society "The art of Kopasz is radically and consistently to-the-point; he is seeking the essence of his own being which one might call the seeking of truth in the original sense of the term, setting aside its somewhat tattered and clichéd nature. In retrospect, Kopasz’ works feature a steady tendency of constructive demolition, the way the layers peel off – in both an intellectual and material sense – in the process of the artist’s reduces his materials and means in an attempt to accomplish a kind of purification. Kopasz’ painting is built on contrasts. Form and colour, gesture and structure, light and shadow, line and patch, rarefaction and densification vie for prominence while complementing the other. One of the fundamental tenets of Kopasz’ art is the confrontation of art-historical time with personal time. The historical expressions often used in the titles of his works suggest that the phases of the real-time life-and-death struggle magically follow the century-old movement of art. By means of this tautological process, Kopasz remythifies his art, revealing that narrative is possible within the realm of abstraction. But this “parlance” is hard to verbalise, because it is essentially on a gut-level and visual, and also it seeks the same features in the art of the historical eras. Kopasz’ painting is passionate, fuelled by restrained instinct. Kopasz seeks the spiritual and psychological relationships underlying each period style, and projects on them his own world of imagery. When James Joyce wrote Ulysses, renewing the tradition of the novel, he felt the need to have a “handhold,” perhaps to legitimise his own course, and so the structure of his novel follows that of the Odyssey. Kopasz, who at the start of his career, moved away step by step from the portrayal of primary reality, then abandoned the sensual, metaphorical use of materials to peel off the painterly layers he had created himself, arrived to the primary use of gesture. His career as a painter thus far can be regarded as a single personal ritual in which the artist came closer and closer to a condition not unlike a transcendent state, in which the gesture (managed from the subconscious spheres) and a conscious painterly programme live together in harmonious symbiosis. Setting out from Abstract and Lyrical Expressionism, drawing much on Informel, Tamás Kopasz has arrived at a lyrical and very personal abstract style, in which artistic experience keeps under the softest possible control the instinctiveness of the gesture. The way of the sculptor is closely attached to that of the painter, and while painting and sculpture have for a good decade now been running parallel, the painter has the upper hand. The sculptor has to take a new course to accomplish the painter’s ideas." (Katalin T.Nagy,art historian)